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Candy Floss Princess Parties

You will Sparkle, Glimmer and shine and have a glorious time. Telephone: 07935 338834

Princess Parties Rickmansworth

Princess party

Welcome to the home of Candy Floss Princess Parties, here at Candy Floss Princess Pamper Parties, we can provide your daughter with the Princess party of her dreams, Our area covers Rickmansworth and we have lots of parties on offer including our Princess Party, Pamper Party, One Direction Party, Real Princess Party, Frozen Princess Party, Disney Princess Party, Prince and Princess Party, Princess Academy Party, and the You to us Princess party. The You to us Party is a princess party that takes every aspect of your daughters princess party away from the parents, we will hire the venue and we set the scene for your special little princess. Our aim at Candy Floss Princess Pamper Parties is for your daughter to sparkle, glimmer and shine and have a wonderful time, whether it is our frozen princess party with Princess Elsa or our Prince and Princess Party; your little princess’s event will never be forgotten. Once you book a Candy floss princess party you have entered the Candy Floss Princess world, You can book on line and also order your little princesses Princess goody bags, princess presents, princess Candy Cones, Princess sweet trees, Princess Balloons, Princess Piñatas, Princess Table Cloths and so much more from our Candy Floss Princess Candy Store and Candy Floss princess Party Supplies. One of our more popular parties at the moment is or Frozen party, we can supply a Frozen Princess Party with or with out Princess Elsa, Frozen 2 is hitting the cinemas next year and we will be providing Princess Elsa along with Olaf and Princess Anna. So don’t delay order your princess party today or your little princess will miss out.
















Information about Rickmansworth

Rickmansworth is a small town in south-west Hertfordshire, England, situated approximately 20 miles (32 km) northwest of central London and inside the perimeter of the M25 motorway. The town is mainly to the north of the Grand Union Canal (formerly the Grand Junction Canal) and the River Colne. The nearest large town is Watford, approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) to the east. Rickmansworth is the administrative seat of the Three Rivers District Council, the local authority named from the confluence of three rivers within its borders. The River Gade and the Grand Union Canal join the upper River Colne near Rickmansworth's eastern boundary and are joined by the River Chess near the town centre from where the enlarged Colne flows south to form a major tributary of the River Thames. In popular slang, Rickmansworth is referred to as "Ricky". The name Rickmansworth comes from the Saxon name Ryckmer, the local landowner, and worth meaning a farm or stockade. In the Domesday Book of 1086 it was recorded as the Manor of Prichemaresworde. Other spellings include Rykemarwurthe (1119–46), Richemaresworthe (1180), Rykemerewrthe (1248), Richemereworthe (1259), Rikesmareswrth (1287), Rikmansworth (1382), Rikmeresworth (1396) [1] & Rykemerysworth (1418). There was a settlement in this part of the Colne valley in the Stone age. Rickmansworth was one of five manors with which the great Abbey of St Albans had been endowed when founded in 793 by King Offa. Local tithes supported the abbey, which provided clergy to serve the people until the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539. Around the time of the Domesday Book, the population of "Prichemareworth" may have been about 200. Cardinal Wolsey, in his capacity as Abbot of St Albans, held the Manor of le More in the valley. The manor house was replaced by the hill-top mansion Moor Park, which eventually became the residence of Admiral Lord Anson, who commissioned Capability Brown to remake the formal gardens, and in 1828 of the Barons Ebury; it is now the Golf Club House. The wider area, including Croxley Green, Moor Park, Batchworth, Mill End, West Hyde and Chorleywood, formed the original parish of Rickmansworth. In 1851, the population had grown to 4,800, and the parish was divided. St Mary's Church serves the parish concentrated in the town and extending to Batchworth and parts of Moor Park. The town had a population of 14,571 recorded at the 2001 census. The three rivers, the Colne, Chess and Gade, provided water for the watercress trade and power for corn milling, silk weaving, paper making and brewing, all long gone. Other industries have included leather-tanning, soft drinks, soya processing, laundry, straw-plaiting and stocking production. Now there are commercial offices and commuter homes, and the rivers, canal and flooded gravel pits provide for recreation. West Mill, a water mill, existed at the time of the Domesday Survey. It was leased to the abbot and convent of St Albans by Ralph Bukberd for a term of years ending in 1539. In 1533, they leased it from the end of this term for twenty-six years to Richard Wilson of Watford. He was to keep in repair the mill and also two millstones, 10 inches (25 centimetres) thick, and 4 ft 8 in (142 cm) in breadth.[3] The mill was leased in 1544 to William Hutchinson, yeoman of the spicery, and Janet his wife for their lives.[4] It afterwards came to John Wilson, and was granted in 1576–77 to Richard Master.[4] There was also a water-mill called Batchworth Mill, and a fishery called Blacketts Mill in Rickmansworth.[4] Batchworth Mill was later used as a cotton mill, but was bought in 1820 by Messrs. John Dickinson & Co., and converted into paper mills, now the site of Affinity Water.[4] Scotsbridge Mill was also productive but now is home to a restaurant with the unusual feature of a salmon run. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries many of the principal inhabitants were described as 'clothiers,' from which it may be inferred that the manufacture of cloth was at one time carried on in the parish, but this industry has long since ceased. There were also silk and flock mills here, described in 1808 as recently built. A long-running dispute over water levels in the Batchford area, following construction of the Grand Junction Canal, was resolved in 1825, when an 8.2-foot (2.5 m) obelisk was erected in a pond, to act as a water gauge. It records the agreement made between the canal company, John Dickinson the miller at Batchworth Mill, and R. Williams of Moor Park the landowner.[5] Lord Ebury's railway[edit] In July 1860 Lord Ebury obtained powers to construct a 4.5 mile single-track railway line between Watford and Rickmansworth, which opened in October 1862. Rickmansworth (Church Street) station was opposite the church to the south of the town with interchange sidings with the nearby Grand Union Canal.[6] The line had stations at Watford Junction and Watford High Street and a depot in Watford. A further Parliamentary authorisation was obtained a year later to construct an extension from Rickmansworth to connect with the Great Western Railway's Uxbridge branch, but this was never realised.[7] Despite hopes the railway would bring economic development and serve the factories and warehouses that had developed along the Grand Union Canal, it was Watford that grew at a faster pace and drew business from Rickmansworth. The railway was dogged with financial problems and a further Act of Parliament in 1863 authorised the issue of further shares to the value of £30,000 (£40,000 worth had already been issued).[8] The service consisted of five trains each way. The line was worked from the outset by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR), which paid the WRR 50% of the gross earnings.[9] The railway was never financially successful and the official receiver was called in only four years after opening.[10] The company attempted to remedy its financial problems by opening several freight branches, the most notable being to the Croxley printers and to the Grand Union Canal at Croxley Green. The company was absorbed by the burgeoning LNWR whose station it shared at Watford Junction in 1881.