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Candy Floss Princess Parties

You will Sparkle, Glimmer and shine and have a glorious time. Telephone: 07935 338834

Princess Parties Milton Keynes

Princess party

Welcome to the home of Candy Floss Princess Parties, here at Candy Floss Princess Pamper Parties, we can provide your daughter with the Princess party of her dreams, Our area covers Milton Keynes and we have lots of parties on offer including our Princess Party, Pamper Party, One Direction Party, Real Princess Party, Frozen Princess Party, Disney Princess Party, Prince and Princess Party, Princess Academy Party, and the You to us Princess party. The You to us Party is a princess party that takes every aspect of your daughters princess party away from the parents, we will hire the venue and we set the scene for your special little princess. Our aim at Candy Floss Princess Pamper Parties is for your daughter to sparkle, glimmer and shine and have a wonderful time, whether it is our frozen princess party with Princess Elsa or our Prince and Princess Party; your little princess’s event will never be forgotten. Once you book a Candy floss princess party you have entered the Candy Floss Princess world, You can book on line and also order your little princesses Princess goody bags, princess presents, princess Candy Cones, Princess sweet trees, Princess Balloons, Princess Piñatas, Princess Table Cloths and so much more from our Candy Floss Princess Candy Store and Candy Floss princess Party Supplies. One of our more popular parties at the moment is or Frozen party, we can supply a Frozen Princess Party with or with out Princess Elsa, Frozen 2 is hitting the cinemas next year and we will be providing Princess Elsa along with Olaf and Princess Anna. So don’t delay order your princess party today or your little princess will miss out.
















Information about Milton Keynes

Milton Keynes sometimes abbreviated MK, is a large town in Buckinghamshire, England. It is the administrative centre of the Borough of Milton Keynes and was formally designated as a new town on 23 January 1967,[2] with the design brief to become a 'city' in scale. It is located about 45 mi (72 km) north-west of London At designation, its 89 km2 (34 sq mi) area incorporated the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford along with another fifteen villages and farmland in between. It took its name from the existing village of Milton Keynes, a few miles east of the planned centre. At the 2011 census the population of the Milton Keynes urban area, including the adjacent Newport Pagnell and Woburn Sands, was 229,941,[1] and that of the wider borough, which has been a unitary authority independent of Buckinghamshire County Council since 1997, was 248,800,[3] (compared with a population of around 53,000 for the same area in 1961.[4] Almost all the approx 196,000 population increase since 1961 has arisen in the urban area). In the 1960s, the British government decided that a further generation of new towns in the south-east of England was needed to relieve housing congestion in London. Population trend of Borough and Urban Area 1801–2001 Since the 1950s, overspill housing for several London boroughs had been constructed in Bletchley.[5][6][7] Further studies[8][9] in the 1960s identified north Buckinghamshire as a possible site for a large new town, a new city,[10] encompassing the existing towns of Bletchley, Stony Stratford and Wolverton. The New Town (informally and in planning documents, "New City") was to be the biggest yet, with a target population of 250,000,[11] in a 'designated area' of 21,850 acres (34.1 sq mi; 88.4 km2).[12] The name "Milton Keynes" was taken from the existing village of Milton Keynes on the site.[13] The site was deliberately located equidistant from London, Birmingham, Leicester, Oxford and Cambridge with the intention[14] that it would be self-sustaining and eventually become a major regional centre in its own right. Planning control was taken from elected local authorities and delegated to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC). The Corporation's strongly modernist designs featured regularly in the magazines Architectural Design and the Architects' Journal. MKDC was determined to learn from the mistakes made in the earlier New Towns and revisit the Garden City ideals. They set in place the characteristic grid roads that run between districts ('grid squares'), as well as the intensive planting, lakes and parkland that are so evident today. Central Milton Keynes was not intended to be a traditional town centre but a business and shopping district that supplemented the Local Centres in most of the grid squares.[13] This non-hierarchical devolved city plan was a departure from the English New Towns tradition and envisaged a wide range of industry and diversity of housing styles and tenures across the city. The largest and almost the last of the British New Towns, Milton Keynes has stood the test of time far better than most, and has proved flexible and adaptable.[15] The radical grid plan was inspired by the work of Californian urban theorist Melvin M. Webber (1921–2006), described by the founding architect of Milton Keynes, Derek Walker, as the "father of the city".[16] Webber thought that telecommunications meant that the old idea of a city as a concentric cluster was out of date and that cities which enabled people to travel around them readily would be the thing of the future achieving "community without propinquity" for residents.[17] The Government wound up MKDC in 1992, 25 years after the new town was created, transferring control to the Commission for New Towns (CNT) and then finally to English Partnerships, with the planning function returning to local council control (since 1974 and the Local Government Act 1972, the Borough of Milton Keynes). From 2004 to 2011, a Government quango, the Milton Keynes Partnership, had development control powers to accelerate the growth of Milton Keynes. Along with many other towns and boroughs, Milton Keynes competed for formal city status in the 2000, 2002 and 2012 competitions, but was not successful. Nevertheless, the term "city" is used by its citizens, local media and bus services to describe itself, perhaps because the term "town" is taken to mean one of the constituent towns. Road signs refer to "Central Milton Keynes" or "Shopping" when directing traffic to its centre.